Login: 
Passwort: 
Neuanmeldung 
Passwort vergessen



Das neue Heft erscheint am 6. März
Leserreise in die Serengeti, Teil 1
Auf der Suche nach dem passenden Flugzeug
Wetterkunde: Wolkenanalysen
Eine App für mehr Flugsicherheit
Neufassung Part 23
Unfall: Eile, Zucker, Crash
Engagierter Journalismus aus Sicht des eigenen Cockpits
Antworten sortieren nach:  Datum - neue zuerst |  Datum - alte zuerst |  Bewertung

23. November 2015 Jan Brill

Luftrecht: EASA Regulation Application


Four Things EASA Has to Fix Now – Part 4: The Answer is Not 42

No subject, no interpretation of any EASA-rule is responsible for more arguments and more pub brawls than FCL.055. The rather short paragraph could keep linguists and lawyers employed for years. The heart of the matter is: When flying in a foreign country where english can’t be used but I’m capable of using another language sufficiently (e.g. French), do I need a language proficiency (LP) for that language or is my English LP enough? That is the holy grail, question of questions in Part-FCL. And the answer is not 42!



4. FCL.055: Language Proficiency – Is English Enough?


Cause for brawls and duels: No other question stemming from Part-FCL has been as hotly debated as FCL.055. Does an English language proficiency suffice, even if you utter a few VFR position reports in French or German? Even EASA can't seem to make up it's mind and issues varying interpretations.
No subject, no interpretation of any EASA-rule is responsible for more arguments and more pub brawls than FCL.055. The rather short paragraph could keep linguists and lawyers employed for years. The heart of the matter is: When flying in a foreign country where english can’t be used but I’m capable of using another language sufficiently (e.g. French), do I need a language proficiency (LP) for that language or is my English LP enough? That is the holy grail, question of questions in Part-FCL. And the answer is not 42!


First off, this is only applicable at small VFR airfields. And mostly for air-to-air radio communication. So this does not concern IFR-flights or commercial air transport. It’s 100% a GA-thing. But it may have huge consequences, as especially in France many smaller airfields and glider sites mandate air-to-air in French. So to fly safely at these airfields, you would have to at least issue your position reports within the pattern in French. Now we don’t have a French LP. But we do have an English one. Are we allowed to say: “D-EABC, en vent-arrière piste 27” on the radio?

FCL.055 reads:

General. Aeroplane, helicopter, powered-lift and airship pilots required to use the radio telephone shall not exercise the privileges of their licences and ratings unless they have a language proficiency endorsement on their licence in either English or the language used for radio communications involved in the flight.

You can legitimately read this paragraph both ways. The first interpretation is the literal one. Simply look at the grammar. You need to have “either English or the language used for radio communications”. Just read the words: “either” language proficiency will do.

However, that would mean that you do some rudimentary radio-calls in a language you don’t have a language proficiency in. And while we have done exactly that for decades, it somehow now scares the bejesus out of us.

The other interpretation holds that the language you use must always match your LP. This is an interpretation that is very common in Germany, as we have a tough time doing something without it being explicitly permitted, examined, stamped or otherwise approved. It is also the way most lawyers we asked read this.

However, we as a Magazine have adopted interpretation no. 1. English is sufficient. Not only because we like it better, but also because – if you always had to have the matching LP to the language you use – the first part “in either English or” would be redundant.

EASA though, doesn’t seem to speak with one voice on this. While during the safety conference in Rome EASA-officers present emphatically supported interpretation no. 1 (English is enough, even if you utter a few position reports in French), an EASA lawyer shortly before AERO 2015 blessed the entire GA industry with his take on this, which was – not surprisingly – answer no 2.

The Agency has to clarify that. This is not some aviation version of the chicken-egg-conundrum. The prospect of getting into trouble with the authorities in a foreign country is real and a justified concern. And it keeps a lot of pilots from visiting other countries in Europe. Wasn’t that what EASA set out to make easier?


Summary

The idea, that you lay down the law and 32 states within EASA interpret it uniformly and consistently was a naive one. There will be differences in comprehension and application. What is needed is a central clearing point for divergent interpretations.

Assuming competent authorities and their subjects (pardon, “customers”) want to do the right thing – and they do, they really do – some EASA-run arbitration board could provide guidance along the way, before the labyrinthine way through the courts yields different results in each member states.

Applicant and authority can jointly call upon this body and decisions should be published in a legally binding FAQ on the level of an AMC. This would be a lot quicker than going through a change in the implementing rules each and every time.


Let’s look at our four cases and get a damage report:


We have the case of EASAs practical joke on the European PPL-instructors. On the one hand they are allowed to instruct class- and typeratings to holders of higher licenses but on the other hand they are not allowed to get paid for this according to FCL.205.A.
Even though the intention of the Agency has clearly been stated, some national authorities are unable or unwilling to resolve this obvious contradiction and revert to the most repressive application: “If they aren’t allowed to get paid, you can’t hire them in your ATO.”
Damage: PPL-instructors are practically unemployable in any larger ATO, training moves to neighboring countries.


Then we have a runaway local authority simply refusing to make the differentiation between prerequisites for a new applicant and conditions for revalidation and renewal. They then get support from a court that claims: “Since it can’t be ruled out, that EASA might have meant it that way, we better err on the side of caution”.
Damage: Type Rating Instructors lose their privileges after moving to a Class-II-Medical/PPL.


Third, we have one authority simply getting the declared intend of the lawmaker in FCL.720.A(c) wrong by arguing that the only way to “have fulfilled the requirements for a multi-engine IR(A)” is to actually have one.
Damage: Huge and unnecessary cost for the applicant and highly counterproductive training as getting some hours in an MEP-trainer hardly prepares you for a high performance complex aeroplane with its very different characteristics.


Finally we have the great language proficiency riddle, and an agency supporting both interpretations, depending on who you ask.
Damage: Pilots abstaining from flights to other countries and avoiding small and otherwise perfectly suitable GA-airfields.


In all of these cases a rewording or clarification in the law would probably do the trick. But that takes a long time and new problems such as these arise every day. In some cases, like FCL.205.A the current problem was actually caused by a hasty fix to another one.

An arbitration board for FCL and OPS questions which hands out an initial ruling within weeks and whose decisions can be challenged in court, can greatly reduce the impact of such issues as in most cases authorities want to get it right, but may need legal backing to come around.




The Author is Managing Editor of Pilot und Flugzeug Magazine and the Accountable Manager of a small Approved Training Organisation (ATO). He holds an FAA ATP CFII/ME and an EASA CPL(A) with FI ME CPL IR and TRI(A) privileges. He’s also an EASA class- and typerating examiner. When he’s not busy bugging the authorities he freelances with a German Air Ambulance Service.


Bewertung: +5.00 [5]  
 




23. November 2015: Von Stefan Jaudas an Jan Brill
Ich verstehe jetzt nicht, wie man das irgendwie anders interpretieren kann als "entweder - oder".

Wenn dem nicht so wäre, hätte es ja andere Formulierungen gegeben:
  • "... the language used for radio communications involved in the flight ..."
    • Klare Sache, man müsste in der jeweiligen Sprache proficient sein. Wenn man z.B. von F über D und CZ nach H fliegen würde, und an allen angeflogenen kleinen GA- Plätzen in der Landessprache angesprochen werden würde, dann bräuchte man mindestens Level 4 in Französisch, Deutsch, Tschechisch und Ungarisch.
    • Dass das absurd ist, dürfte selbsterklärend sein.
    • Und herzlichen Glückwunsch, wenn man dann eine Rundreise in die Schweiz anschließen würde, dann kämen noch Italienisch und Romansch dazu. In Spanien könnte man dann noch zusätzlich Katalonisch und Baskisch reininterpretieren ... ;-)
  • "... English ..."
    • Das wäre auch selbsterklärend. Die einzige zugelassene Sprache wäre Englisch.
    • Das wäre zwar einheitlich, und würde im globalisierten sich selbst langsam abschaffenden D-Land durchaus auf Befürworter in fast allen Parteien treffen, aber
      • mit unseren linksrheinischen Nachbarn nicht zu machen (en avant, mes braves!),
      • für lokale Flüge und Piloten EU-weit unangemessen.
  • "... both English and the language used for radio communications involved in the flight ..."
    • Auch was wäre eine mögliche Formulierung gewesen. Und wäre die Absurdität hoch drei.

23. November 2015: Von RotorHead an Stefan Jaudas
Schon die Formulierung mit "entweder - oder" ist krank. Wie sieht es denn aus, wenn man z.B. Englisch und Deutsch in der Lizenz stehen hat? Dann man zumindest in Deutschland das "entweder - oder" nicht erfüllt und darf dort eigentlich gar nicht fliegen...

... ein einfaches "oder" wäre ausreichend und sachlich richtiger.
23. November 2015: Von Achim H. an RotorHead Bewertung: +2.00 [2]
they have a language proficiency endorsement on their licence in either English or the language used for radio communications involved in the flight.

Guter Einwand, das hat bisher noch keiner erwähnt, der Satz ist schon grammatikalisch völlig falsch. Either ... or bezeichnet eine Auswahl von zwei Optionen, wobei nicht beide gleichzeitig getroffen werden können (XOR würde der Informatiker sagen). Man darf also folgerichtig mit LP Englisch und LP Deutsch in der Lizenz nicht am Flugfunk teilnehmen.

Zeigt was für Stümper hier am Werk waren (sind?).

Meine Theorie ist, dass man ursprünglich LP Englisch vorschreiben wollte (wegen der Chinesen auf Youtube). Dann sagte der französische Abgeordnete "mais non, il y a d'autres langues officielles!" und sie haben den Satz erweitert für die französischen Piloten, die von Frankreich direkt ohne Zwischenstation nach Québec fliegen.
23. November 2015: Von RotorHead an Achim H.
... nein, nein, ohne den Sprachnachweis darf man die Rechte der Lizenz nicht ausüben, also nicht fliegen!
23. November 2015: Von Rudolf Meier an Stefan Jaudas
Ich könnte gut damit leben, wenn wir uns weltweit einheitlich auf Englisch für alles in der Aviation einigen. Alles wäre klar, jeder hat die Chance jeden zu verstehen und dieses babylonische Durcheinander hätte ein Ende. Nach EU könnte je theoretisch heutzutage jede anerkannte Regionalsprache für den Anflug auf einem kleinen Platz gefordert werden und dann wirds richtig gschamisch. Radio Ops Oberbayrisch only, am besten noch mit eigener LP. Weg mit dem ganzen Zeugs, jedenfalls für den Luftverkehr.
23. November 2015: Von Tobias Schnell an Rudolf Meier
Das wäre wohl doch ein wenig übers Ziel hinausgeschossen. Die Fliegerei braucht nicht noch eine neue Eintrittshürde in Form von Englisch Level 4.

Tobias
24. November 2015: Von Rudolf Meier an Tobias Schnell Bewertung: +2.00 [2]
Die Änderung würde ich sogar für sinnvoll halten und sehe die nicht als "Verschärfung".
24. November 2015: Von Patrick Whiskey Echo Yankee an Stefan Jaudas
Ich halte eine UK Lizenz und habe mich bei der CAA mal erkundigt, was ich tun muss, um meine Muttersprache Deutsch neben dem Englisch Level 6 eingetragen zu bekommen. Die Antwort war folgende:

"As the main concern of ICAO is the proficiency in English, for air navigation the UK licence complies, we do not have a legal requirement to show any other language, so regret that German cannot be added to a UK licence."

Wie sieht es im Übrigen für ausländische Piloten in Deutschland aus, die dann mit der korrekten LP (Englisch) nach der vorteilhaften Lesart 1 (also "either English or...") fliegen, aber KEIN deutsches Sprechfunkzeugnis haben? Wie fliegt so jemand etwa Uetersen an, ein Platz, der laut AIP nur "DE" und nicht "EN" anbietet?
24. November 2015: Von Stefan Jaudas an Patrick Whiskey Echo Yankee
... tja, da hat die CAA sicher recht.

Und die ICAO hätte das dann auch so in ihren Richtlinien festschreiben, und die EU ihrerseits das so übernehmen müssen.

Ham' sie aber leider nicht.

Weil, das wäre ja letzten Endes das logische Ende:

Jeder Pilot darf seine Landessprache, und wenn Fremdsprache, dann Englisch. Punkt. Nur blöd wiederrum, dass es auch noch Französisch, Spanisch, Russisch, Chinesisch (Mandarin? Kantonesisch?) und Arabisch als offizielle ICAO-Sprachen gibt.
24. November 2015: Von Tobias Schnell an Rudolf Meier Bewertung: +3.00 [3]
Naja, Du würdest jeden, der nicht mindestens in der Lage ist, ein Englisch-Level4 zu erreichen, generell von der Motorfliegerei ausschließen. Auch wenn derjenige nichts anderes machen möchte, als von seinem unkontrollierten Platz aus ein paar Stunden im Jahr um den Pudding zu fliegen.

Die Leute, für das "die Fliegerei" ist, sind vielleicht nicht hier in diesem Forum unterwegs. Aber es gibt sie - und die Schnittmenge mit nicht oder kaum vorhandenen englischen Sprachkenntnissen ist ziemlich groß. Für geschätzt 20% der Piloten in meinem Umfeld wäre eine EN-Level4-Prüfung eine sehr ernsthafte Hürde und sie würden eher die Fliegerei aufgeben als sich die Prüfung und das Funken in der Fremdsprache anzutun.


Tobias
24. November 2015: Von Rudolf Meier an Tobias Schnell
Wenn wir wirklich glaubhaft an einer nachhaltigen und strukturellen Verbesserung in der Allgemeinen Luftfahrt mitarbeiten wollen, dann halte ich es für vermessen, wenn wir eine 100% Gegenposition einnehmen und eigene "Opfer" kategorisch ausschliessen. Dann sind wir nämlich keinen Deut besser als diejenigen, die in der Betonbürokratie nur auf Gegenwehr aus sind - mentale Aufrüstung ist Quatsch für eine Problemlösung. Einen guten Kompromiss können und sollten wir anstreben. Ein solcher beruht aber fast immer darauf, dass es beiden Seiten mehr oder weniger gleich weh tut.

Ich will durchaus nicht per se diejenigen ausschliessen die heute kein Englisch LP4 beherrschen, aber ich sehe durchaus eine Legitimation auch an dieser Stelle fliegerische Fortbildung zu verlangen und wer nach einer Entscheidung und Übergangsfrist dann kein "Fliegerenglisch" gelernt hat, ja, den will ich dann als Sicherheitsrisiko ausschliessen. Den Anteil derjenigen ohne ausreichend aufpolierbare Englischkenntnisse halte ich im übrigen für sehr klein. Der Anteil der Faulenzer, der Dummsteller und der Verweigerer aus Prinzip ist natürlich auch vorhanden, aber mit denen will ich gar nicht diskutieren müssen. Eine Verbesserung der, zugegebenermaßen gruselig schlechten und praxisfremden, Englischprüfungen LP4@EASA-Deutschland muss allerdings auch noch stattfinden.
24. November 2015: Von Tobias Schnell an Rudolf Meier Bewertung: +3.00 [3]
Wenn wir wirklich glaubhaft an einer nachhaltigen und strukturellen Verbesserung in der Allgemeinen Luftfahrt mitarbeiten wollen
Verbesserung wovon? Wo ist das Problem, das durch eine Pflicht zum Englisch lernen gelöst wird?
wer nach einer Entscheidung und Übergangsfrist dann kein "Fliegerenglisch" gelernt hat, ja, den will ich dann als Sicherheitsrisiko ausschliessen
Worin besteht dieses Sicherheitsrisiko? Wann hat es das letzte Mal in Deutschland eine kritische Situation gegeben, weil ein Privatpilot mangelhafte Englischkenntnisse hatte?

Es wäre schon sehr hilfreich, wenn Piloten an unkontrollierten Plätzen überhaupt sinnvoll (!) funken würden und sich nicht auf ein "Die Deltagolfbravo in fünnef Minuten am Platz" beschränken würden. Wenn man denen noch vorschreiben würde, das auf Englisch zu tun - gute Nacht. Dann kramen die die ihnen sonst eher unbekannte AIP VFR heraus und berufen sich darauf, dass auch NORDO an den meisten Plätzen erlaubt ist.

Also - hier mein Opfervorschlag: Funkpflicht an jedem Platz, Pflicht zur korrekten Meldung 5 und 2 Minuten vor Einflug in die Platzrunde mit Angabe der Himmelsrichtung, Meldung aller Teile der Platzrunde und Absichten, aktive Koordination air-to-air mit anderem Platzverkehr. Eine Stunde praktisches Training in diesen Verfahren beim nächsten Verlängerungsflug, FI bestätigt dieses Training auf speziellem Formular. Bringt garantiert mehr Sicherheit als Zwangsenglisch.

Tobias
24. November 2015: Von Wolff E. an Tobias Schnell
Worin besteht dieses Sicherheitsrisiko? Wann hat es das letzte Mal in Deutschland eine kritische Situation gegeben, weil ein Privatpilot mangelhafte Englischkenntnisse hatte?

Es würde dann weltweit gelten sowie für alle Piloten (nicht nur PPLer) und nicht nur in Deutschland. Mal über den Deckelrand schauen. Da würde man z.B. auch verstehen, was Franzosen in Frankreich und Spanier in Spanien funken (auch IFR!). Und da gibt es viele Länder, Rusland, China, Thailand, Korea usw. die sich oft in Landessprache unterhalten und man "nix versteht".
24. November 2015: Von Wolfgang Lamminger an Rudolf Meier
Eine Verbesserung der, zugegebenermaßen gruselig schlechten und praxisfremden, Englischprüfungen LP4@EASA-Deutschland muss allerdings auch noch stattfinden.

wie würde die Deiner Meinung nach aussehen?
24. November 2015: Von Roland Schmidt an Wolff E.
Okay, wann hat es das letzte Mal in Korea eine kritische Situation gegeben, weil ein deutscher Privatpilot mangelhafte Englischkenntnisse hatte? ;-)
24. November 2015: Von Tobias Schnell an Wolff E. Bewertung: +2.00 [2]
IFR- und Berufspiloten brauchen auch heute schon English Proficiency, egal wo sie fliegen. Was es nützt, beschreibst Du sehr schön - je südlicher, je mehr Landessprache. Sanktioniert von der ICAO durch die großzügige Festlegung von zahlreichen Amtssprachen in der Fliegerei.

Von weltweit mal nicht zu reden: An dem Tag, wo sämtlicher IFR-Funkverkehr und der Funkverkehr an kontrollierten Flugplätzen (ja, das dann gerne auch für PPLler!) in Europa auf Englisch stattfindet - dann, aber erst dann sind die Privatpiloten dran, die Sonntags nichts anderes wollen, als von Koblenz nach Trier zu fliegen.

Tobias
24. November 2015: Von Tee Jay an Roland Schmidt
D-XXXX: “Ground, wie lautet unsere Startfreigabezeit?”
Ground: “If you want an answer you must speak in English.”
D-XXXX: “I am a German, flying a German airplane, in Germany. Why must I speak English?”
Stimme aus dem OFF im feinsten britischen Accent: “Because you lost the bloody war lad.”
24. November 2015: Von Patrick Whiskey Echo Yankee an Tobias Schnell
"die Sonntags nichts anderes wollen, als von Koblenz nach Trier zu fliegen."

Es geht doch gar nicht um Karlchen Meyer, der von Koblenz nach Trier will. Es geht um Jacques de Avion, der vielleicht auch mal von Reims nach Trier will. Oder um Karlchen Meyer, der vielleicht auch mal nach Reims will.

Die Ignoranz jener Art von Ländern wie Deutschland und Frankreich, auf ihrer Landessprache im Flugfunk zu beharren, ist beschämend. Jemand, der nicht den Willen oder den Intellekt aufzubringen vermag, ein paar Phrasen in einer allgemeingültigen Sprache auswendig zu lernen um den grenzüberschreitenden Flugverkehr sicherer, ja mitunter erst legal möglich zu machen, soll aber motiviert und smart genug sein, ein Luftfahrzeug zu führen und sich hier ständig weiterzubilden, schließlich hat er ja mal eine "License to Learn" erhalten?

Warum funktioniert das in anderen Ländern wie etwa den Niederlanden hervorragend, aber in Deutschland, neein, in Deutschland wäre das ja furchtbar, wenn wir plötzlich Wörter in einer Fremdsprache erlernen müssten, uiuiui!

"An dem Tag, wo sämtlicher IFR-Funkverkehr und der Funkverkehr an kontrollierten Flugplätzen (ja, das dann gerne auch für PPLler!) in Europa auf Englisch stattfindet"

Wo tut er das denn nicht? Ernstgemeinte Frage - ich habe es bisher bei IFR-Verkehr nur so erlebt. Mir selber würde auch nicht einfallen, in der Düsseldorfer Kontrollzone auf Deutsch zu funken, allein schon aus Höflichkeit und Respekt gegenüber dem anderen Verkehr. Dass zwischendurch mal ein paar Begriffe auf Deutsch fallen und ein "Hallo" und "Schönen Abend" drin sind, geschenkt.
25. November 2015: Von Karpa Lothar an Patrick Whiskey Echo Yankee Bewertung: +3.00 [3]
Warum funktioniert das in anderen Ländern wie etwa den Niederlanden hervorragend

Weil das Land zu wenig Einwohner hat um Filme zu synchronisieren - die Niederländer lernen durchs TV englisch und deutsch...

Wenn ich VFR fliege, dann funke ich in D deutsch, bei FIS und auch bei kontrollierten Plätzen, im Ausland englisch. Und IFR immer englisch. Deutsch ist bequemer und gerade auf FIS will ich auch von anderen Piloten verstanden wissen, die mir als Verkehr gemeldet werden. Und dann bleibe ich im Flow der jeweiligen Sprache einfach drin.
Und ein Großteil der mir bekannten Fliegerkollegen fliegen nur in D und dies meistens ausschliesslich von und zu unkontrollierten Plätzen, manche zu 90 % nur lokal. Warum soll denen neben dem schwachsinnigen ZÜP noch eine weitere Hürde aufgebaut werden? Die würden ihre derzeitigen 10-15 Flugstunden pro Jahr auf 0 reduzieren...
Und viele Vereine brauchen auch diese Wenig-Flieger um überhaupt existieren zu können. Und ohne Vereine erheblich weniger Flugplätze...
Und in anderen Ländern siehts oft nicht viel besser aus...
25. November 2015: Von Erik N. an Karpa Lothar Bewertung: +1.00 [1]
Ja, neben dem Pflicht-Powerflarm ;)))) jetzt auch noch Pflicht-Englisch. Soweit kommt's noch.

Finde ich komplett überreguliert, das Ganze. Wenn ich nur lokal fliege, brauche ich kein Englisch. Wenn ich in Bayern nur Schlepper fliege, nur Bayerisch. Und wenn ich irgendwo hin fliege, wo ich nicht verstanden werde, auch mit Englisch nicht - dann lerne ich die paar Sprachgruppen in der Landessprache.

Und das auch nur, wenn ich vorher angerufen habe und klar ist, daß mich keiner versteht.

Wieso brauchts dafür dann gleich einen Sprachtest mit Stempel ??
25. November 2015: Von Roland Schmidt an Patrick Whiskey Echo Yankee

Es geht doch gar nicht um Karlchen Meyer, der von Koblenz nach Trier will.

Doch, um den geht's. Und der würde sonst evtl. gar nicht mehr fliegen. Nur weil er kein Englisch kann (und nicht nach Frankreich will), muss er doch kein schlechter Pilot sein.

25. November 2015: Von Tee Jay an Erik N.
Daß es auch ohne LP (und sogar ohne BZF) geht, zeigen die vielen ULs... die jetzt aus meiner subjektiven Sicht nicht auffällig schlechter funken wie andere auch. Trotzdem - wie oben bereits beschrieben - wechsele ich nicht nur wegen der Sicherheit sondern auch ein stückweit aus Anstand ins Englische, wenn ausländische Kollegen in die Platzrunde kommen, oder ich in oder durch Kontrollzonen fliege. Gleiches erwarte ich eigentlich auch im Ausland.
25. November 2015: Von Oliver Voigt an Tee Jay
...und dann gibts da noch die Engländer und Amerikaner, bei denen man mit Ihren Dialekten oder Genuschel auch in englisch kein Wort versteht....


okok die Bayern haben es im hohen Norden auch nicht leicht ;-)
25. November 2015: Von Karpa Lothar an Tee Jay
Dürfen die ULs überhaupt funken? ;)
Ich meine so ohne postalische Genehmigung und Prüfung?
Nur zum Segelfliegen brauchte ich vor 40 Jahren noch irgendso ein BZF...

73 Beiträge Seite 1 von 3

 1 2 3 
 

Home
Impressum
© 2004-2017 Airwork Press GmbH. Alle Rechte vorbehalten. Vervielfältigung nur mit Genehmigung der Airwork Press GmbH. Die Nutzung des Pilot und Flugzeug Internet-Forums unterliegt den allgemeinen Nutzungsbedingungen (hier). Es gelten unsere Allgemeinen Geschäftsbedingungen (hier). Hub Version 11.57.01
Zur mobilen Ansicht wechseln
Seitenanfang